Deep Change

Deep Change: Discovering the Leader Within, by Robert E. Quinn, Jossey-Bass, 1996

Overview

All of us look inside ourselves (and our organizations) and find ourselves deeply unsatisfied.  At these times, we commonly try to use a “quick fix” when a deeper change is required.  Without such a risky and deep change, we will die slowly.  These changes, however, are very near to our identity, and so they are scary.  Fear of the unknown commonly locks us into the status quo.  Many people deny the need for change when confronted with the deep issues that plague their institution (or them, personally).  Most organizations have a variety of self-reinforcing structures to keep change superficial.  Deep changes require actions so risky that the death of the organization is at stake.  Many organizations resist such risk.  Excellence, though, can never come without risk.  One way an organization may begin to attack deep issues is to “discuss the undiscussable.”  Visionary leaders (who have moved away from mere management) will gain insights from their employees, but will lead the change themselves.

Critique

Quinn’s many stories make this book inspirational as well as informational.  He writes primarily about corporate business.  And though the preface states that he intends the book to be valuable to anyone in any organization, he assumes a knowledge and experience with the business world often.  His principles are generic, which allows a reader to think about their specific situation as they are reading.  However, at times, the generic language may lead some non-business-oriented readers to be confused.  Nonetheless, there are many good insights and helpful principles overall.  The book excels and good stories and the overall point of the necessity of risking deep change for the health of organizations.

“The fact that we have enough trust and belief in ourselves to pursue our vision is what signals to others that the vision is worth investing in.  Our message is filled with integrity ad good intentions.  However, it is usually our actions, not our words, that send the message.”  p.85.

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